On Christmas Night All Christians Sing and O Come, All Ye Faithful

 
Something to listen to while you read. Sheet music available at Sheet Music Plus.

On Christmas Night‘s text was first published by Irish bishop Luke Wadding in a 1684 work called Small Garland of Pious and Godly Songs (great name!) The tune, however, didn’t really come to light until the early 1900’s when Cecil Sharp (1859–1924) and Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) transcribed it from Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, near Horsham, Sussex. (Thus the name Sussex Carol.) Vaughan Williams later used the carol in both his Fantasia on Christmas Carols (1912) and his Eight Traditional English Carols (1919).

On Christmas night all Christians sing
to hear the news the angels bring;
on Christmas night all Christians sing
to hear the news the angels bring:
news of great joy, news of great mirth,
news of our merciful King’s birth.

Since “on Christmas (Eve) night (almost) all Christians sing” the internationally beloved O Come, All Ye Faithful (a.k.a. Adeste Fideles), I paired the two carols together in a jubilant, fun to play piano arrangement.
On Christmas Night All Christians Sing with O Come All Ye Faithful Piano Sheet Music

O Come, All Ye Faithful has a history that has been debated over the years, but research published in 1947 proved the carol was written by Englishman John Francis Wade (1711-1786), a music teacher and copyist, while he was living in Douai in northern France. The Latin version of the carol migrated to England where it was published as a hymn in 1782 and began its rise in popularity. In 1852, Anglican clergyman Frederick Oakeley (1802-1880) created an English translation – the most popular one that we still use today.

Sing, choirs of angels, sing in exultation,
sing, all ye citizens of heaven above:
“Glory to God, all glory in the highest!”
O come, let us adore him,
O come, let us adore him,
O come, let us adore him, Christ the Lord!